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The following news articles are geared toward students and other professionals.
Landscape Architecture
“Portals” Blends Curated with Organic Print E-mail
Tuesday, 20 June 2017 22:07
Portals by Sandra Muss at the Kreeger Museum / Colin Winterbottom

Moving through the pristine vastness of the Great Hall at the Kreeger Museum in Washington, D.C. is like being inside a monument on the National Mall. But the museum’s new installation and permanent foray into the woods offers a different experience.

Just beyond the structured lines of the architect Phillip Johnson’s Modernist residence-turned-museum are “the woods.” Far from wild, this curated, yet un-manicured portion of the sculpture garden is found in the forested back area of Kreeger’s 5.5-acre property in the residential Foxhall neighborhood north of Georgetown.

Kreeger Museum / Pinterest

Here are a series of mirrored columns clustered among the oak, maple, tulip poplar, and beech trees, and scattered along a wood chip path. These are the Portals.

Artist Sandra Muss designed the piece specifically for the Kreeger as it expanded its sculpture garden into the woods. Muss’ piece is a series of seven ten-foot mirrored steel rectangular columns, wound with rusted wire and vines.

Portals by Sandra Muss / Colin Winterbottom

Despite the size, the columns are unassuming and easy to gaze over, reading as green foliage when viewed from the concrete walkway that wraps around the museum.

But once down in the woods, the scale of the column becomes more palpable, and what appears from above to be a carefully-curated placement of columns becomes a more compelling maze of reflections. Moving through the mirrors distorts the carefully-orchestrated sculpture garden experience — reflecting, and at times framing, bending, and pulling images of the museum and other sculptures down into the woods.

Portals by Sandra Muss / Colin Winterbottom

The woods are a welcome juxtaposition to the hushed, untouchable quality of the building above and offer a more organic component to the museum’s sculpture garden.

“In general, the planting is pretty simple, because it’s the art that wants to be the focus,” said Julie Patronick, landscape designer with McHale, who designed the forested sculpture garden expansion and worked with Muss to incorporate vines on the columns from the surrounding area.

Ultimately, she said, as new pieces are added to the forest, the intention will be to let the art decide its surroundings — be it exposed with only ground cover underneath, or more hidden, and seamless like Portals.


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Office Profile: ILEX Print E-mail
Tuesday, 20 June 2017 07:17
Agence_ILEX_TEAM-1Ilex paysage urbanisme has around 20 members whose comprehensive expertise in the fields of landscaping, architecture and urbanism finds expression in the development and adaptation of the space we inhabit. Guerric Péré founded Ilex in partnership with Martine Rascle and remains its director, working with three associates: Jean-Claude Durual, Claudine Thomas and Nadia Herbreteau. Ilex’s […] Add a comment
 
ASLA News Roundup Print E-mail
Tuesday, 20 June 2017 06:41
ASLA-American-Society-of-Landscape-Architects2017 ASLA Annual Meeting & EXPO, October 20-23, Los Angeles / Celebrating the ASLA Center for Landscape Architecture Add a comment
 
ASLA News Roundup Print E-mail
Tuesday, 20 June 2017 06:41
ASLA-American-Society-of-Landscape-Architects2017 ASLA Annual Meeting & EXPO, October 20-23, Los Angeles / Celebrating the ASLA Center for Landscape Architecture Add a comment
 
ASLA News Roundup Print E-mail
Tuesday, 20 June 2017 06:41
ASLA-American-Society-of-Landscape-Architects2017 ASLA Annual Meeting & EXPO, October 20-23, Los Angeles / Celebrating the ASLA Center for Landscape Architecture Add a comment
 
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Copyright © 2017. Robert Hewitt | Clemson University professor of Landscape Architecture.
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